Jim Crow & Civil Rights


Teacher:Elizabeth Olesen
Extra Help:Thursdays 3 - 4 PM in room 205, or by appointment

Major Upcoming Due Dates (does not include nightly homework)


Jim Crow Biography Podcast Project - Timeline


Approximate Timeline

Monday

Wednesday

Thursday (C)/Friday (D)



October 29th/30th

Roll out project

Resources Reminders

Choose topics

Begin research - Find reference source

HW: Take notes on reference source & locate a secondary source

Get book

November 2nd

Primary vs. Secondary Sources

Take notes on secondary sources and on book

HW: Take notes on secondary sources & book

November 4th

Annotated bib. instructions

Primary source finding instructions

Locate and take notes on primary source(s)

HW: Annotated MLA bibliography

November 5th/6th

Write draft of notes/script for podcast

HW: Finish draft of notes/script for podcast

November 9th

Learn technology for recording podcast

Revise notes/script

Begin recording

HW: Revise as needed; record

November 11th

No school - Veterans day

November 12th/13th

Final project work day - edit podcasts

HW: Finish editing podcast

November 16th

Project due (Annotated MLA Bibliography, script/notes, podcast recording)




First major assignment (Reconstruction essay) timeline:

Block C (M, W, Th)

Block D (M, W, F)

Wednesday 10/14  Race today; outline body paragraphs

HW: Fully outline all body paragraphs


Thursday 10/15 Discuss and write drafts of body paragraphs

HW: Write draft of all body paragraphs


Monday 10/19 Peer edit body paragraphs; Discuss and draft introduction and conclusion paragraphs

HW: Revise and polish draft. Essay due Thursday.


Wednesday 10/21 Begin unit 2

No in-class work time

HW: Revise and polish draft. Essay due next class.


Thursday 10/22 Essay due

Wednesday 10/14  Outline body paragraphs

HW: Fully outline all body paragraphs; write a draft of at least 1 body paragraph


Friday 10/16 Discuss and write drafts of body paragraphs

HW: Write draft of all body paragraphs


Monday 10/19 Peer edit body paragraphs; Discuss and draft introduction and conclusion paragraphs

HW: Revise and polish draft. Essay due Friday.


Wednesday 10/21 Begin unit 2

No in-class work time

HW: Revise and polish draft. Essay due next class.


Friday 10/23 Essay due


HONORS Mini-Assignment #1 "Are all men created equal?" - Block C due Monday 9/14, Block D Monday 9/14


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Course Essential Questions:

How does race affect how we see ourselves and others? 
        What is the role of laws in limiting discrimination?
        How are racial caste systems created and maintained?

How is social change achieved?


Course Summary:

In late 1865, after a bloody civil war, the United States ratified the 13th Amendment, finally abolishing slavery across the nation. The end of slavery began a long and continuing struggle for racial equality. After a promising period of Reconstruction, when newly enfranchised citizens elected the first black legislators to Congress, the country retreated from the agenda of true equality and Jim Crow descended. In the South, African Americans faced laws explicitly aimed at keeping their voices out of government; in the North, blacks encountered daily discrimination. The Boston Red Sox did not hire a black player until 1959 and today, according to the Center for American Progress, approximately 1 in every 15 African American men is incarcerated (compared to 1 in every 106 white men) and African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated.


Many argue that today’s racial politics can be explained by U.S.’s history of laws and social structures regarding race. We will explore the post-Civil War years of Reconstruction, the era of Jim Crow and segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement, tracing the evolution of racial norms and Jim Crow laws. The Reconstruction Unit will focus on the experience of rebuilding the nation after the Civil War and the large-scale policies that tried to create political equality and the retreat from those policies. The Jim Crow Unit will explore the personal stories and experiences of the Jim Crow South, culminating in a biography project. The Civil Rights Movement Unit will feature multimedia sources that explore how the movement began, the resistance to it, and whether it succeeded, posing the question: How is social change achieved? Finally, the class will design its own civic engagement project.


Course Documents

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